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Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Bicycling at Night

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With Lights...

Without Lights...

Follow this link for a comprehensive article on safely riding at night:

The City of Coeur d'Alene plows snow on the Centennial Trail, the Prairie Trail, the Kathleen Trail (west of Ramsey), the Ramsey Trail (from Ramsey Park to the Kroc Center), and the Atlas Trail (from the Prairie Trail south). The Parks Department also keeps the perimeter paths cleared in all city parks. So....dress warm and go riding!

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Rules of the Road Everyone Should Know

Click the following links for Rules of the Roads

BICYCLE RELATED


PEDESTRIAN RELATED

Monday, December 14, 2009

Do the test

Friday, December 4, 2009

Five Bicycle Safety Tips


Wearing a helmet is arguably the most crucial component of bike safety. Beyond that, here are some things to remember:






1. Ride on the right side of the road. It's a common misconception that it's safer to cycle on the sidewalk or on the left side of the road. But both practices can confuse pedestrians and drivers, especially at driveways and intersections.

2. Lighten up. Don't rely on reflectors alone to light you up if you ride at night. Drivers won't be able to see you in the shadows. Invest in bike lights. Idaho Code states that bicycles must have a front light and rear reflector to ride at night. It’s a good idea to use front and rear lights any time visibility may be hindered. Bright clothing is an added bonus.

3. Don't hug the curb. If you ride too close to the road's edge, passing cars might force you off of it or into a curb. Aiming for the right tire track of the right lane is generally a safe bet. Weaving in and out of parked cars is unpredictable and dangerous.

4. Give your bike some TLC. A well-tuned ride is a safe ride. Regularly check your brakes, gears, lights, and tire pressure.

5. Keep your eyes peeled. Make it a habit to look all around when riding — check the ground for bumps and potholes while scanning the horizon for oncoming obstructions. Don’t assume that drivers see you as you approach them.